Newspeak in Venezuela

To read Wikipedia about Venezuela or Hugo Chávez is to read newspeak. In fact, most of what is said or written in media abroad is newspeak. You know, war is peace, peace is war, democracy is dictatorship, dictatorship is democracy, and so on.

Let me give you some examples: The constituting constitutional assembly of 1999 is described as a democratic act, but it was neither democratic nor constitutional. It was a coup d’état, an autogolpe, since it expressly violated the valid constitution of Venezuela. This means that the valid constitution of Venezuela remains the one from 1961, and every act of government since 1999 has been unconstitutional. The whole regime is unconstitutional! It also gives every citizen not just the right but the duty to overthrow this usurper regime.

Furthermore, let’s look at the events of April, 2002. On April 11, when a march of about a million persons approached the presidential palace Miraflores, Chávez ordered the military to open fire at the demonstration. They refused. When snipers and members of the regime instead opened fire, killing well over a dozen on live TV, the outrage was so great that the military asked Chávez to resign, and he stepped down – but he didn’t sign the resignation letter (instead he wrote that “since I have been deposed I abolish my duties as president” on the rear of the letter, and signed it). This was thus a successful application of the non-violent overthrowing of a regime, using the principles that have been promoted by Gene Sharp. However, when the new cabinet was to be sworn in at Miraflores on April 13, a military unit stormed the presidential palace. General Baduel brought back Chávez and restored him to power using military force. Immediately after, the regime rallied supporters to Miraflores, and spread the lie that the “people” had restored Chávez to power. They also spread the lie that there had been a military coup on April 11, using photos of the military units ordered out by Chávez himself (but who refused to obey his orders to fire on civilians) as “proof”. Finally they spent millions on making a propaganda movie which was pedaled around the world, to make their view of history take root: That there was first a military coup, and then the people restored Chávez to power. When as I have described, the truth was the exact opposite. Newspeak.

There are many more examples, but let’s fast forward to the presidential election of Oct 7, 2012. The regime declared Chávez the winner, but the election was neither free nor fair. In a free and fair election I estimate that about 60% would have voted for the opposition candidate. The opposition did not complain, however. Is that a sign that they agreed? Not at all. But it is bad for your health to tell the truth in a country governed by criminals, and where there are tens of thousands of murders committed every year with impunity. This is a situation Venezuela shares with Honduras, even though their political color is different. The common denominator is not political ideology, that is just a facade, a farce for the masses. The common denominator is that both countries are failed states, totally taken over by criminal organizations, maffias, narcos. There are entire swaths of Honduras where the narcos control the government, and in Venezuela the narcos control the central government, the entire country!

To eradicate those cockroaches is not going to be easy.